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Authenticity and Commercialization: Traditional Irish Music’s Balancing Act

In our capitalist society, music has become a decidedly financial endeavor as significant monetary resources are essential in not only the creation and distribution of most mainstream music, but also in the exhibition of a lifestyle which mainstream audiences find desirable. In the scope of Irish society, this can be seen in how the emergence of significant demand, alongside increased commercial viability, has impacted and influenced the development of Irish music in recent decades. This impact can be seen most clearly in the gradual professionalization of the Irish musician, the trade-off these musicians face in balancing authenticity and commercial success, and the change in instrumentation and equipment in the continuing Irish music tradition.             While modern-day Ireland would be considered by many to be a prosperous, wealthy nation, traditional Irish music mostly originates from a time of relative poverty in Ireland. As a result of this, a lack of financial resource

Depicting the Irish Before and After the Baltinglass Rebellion

John Derricke composed his work, The Image of Irelande, with a Discoverie of Woodkarne [1] , in 1578 - directly before the Baltinglass Rebellion in the Pale. It includes a collection of 12 woodcuts and their accompanying verses. In these woodcuts, Derricke addresses many aspects of Ireland’s culture and current affairs as they stood before the rebellion, ranging from their dressing and dining habits to the actions of Irish lords with and against the English. Derricke’s attached artwork serves to reinforce his arguments regarding the Irish in a visual manner. His third poem and plate combination, titled Kern Pillaging Their Own People on a Bodrag, portrays Irish raiders as they pillage a settlement, indiscriminate of ethnicity, and provides a commentary on the lifestyle and mindset of these raiders. An Irish language work which counters this plate is the Irish poem “Dia Libh” [2] written by Aonghus Ó Dálaigh during the Baltinglass rebellion of 1580. In his work, Ó Dálaigh praises

Final Presentation: The Gaelic Peers, The Tudor Sovereigns, and The English Multiple Monarchy