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About

Dia Duit,

My name is Nicholas Harding Bradley and I am currently studying Irish Language and Literature at the University of Notre Dame. This blog was initially intended for personal use in keeping track of the papers, articles, and reviews that I have written throughout my various courses at Notre Dame. However, as I have noticed that there is a scarcity of online resources for many of the topics and materials that I am studying, I have decided to make this public as a very elementary resource for anyone who may require information on these topics. I hope that some of what I write may be useful in the preservation and study of Irish literature and culture.

Le meas,

Nicholas Harding Bradley

Nicholas Harding Bradley



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